Daniels Training Services

Q&A: Do I Describe the Inner Receptacle of a Combination Packaging on the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods?

Q&A: Do I Describe the Inner Receptacle of a Combination Packaging on the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods?

Q&A: Do I Describe the Inner Receptacle of a Combination Packaging on the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods?

A question from an attendee of my Onsite Training (12.01.16):

Hello Daniel,The question is: On the DGD is it proper to put the outer packaging in the Quantity and type of packaging column.  (This is how we have been filling it out since you trained us with no problems from any shipping company)

The forwarder is stating it should say Plastic (Which in the inner packaging) instead of Fiberboard Box (Which is the outer packaging).

Thank you!

I got right on it and had to return to her for some clarification (12.01.16):

I am researching an answer.

Can you provide a description – or a picture – of what the package in question looks like?
  • Is it two fiberboard boxes inside a third fiberboard box that makes the outer packaging?
  • Or is it two plastic inner receptacles inside a fiberboard box?
  • Or something else?

Please advise.

Her reply the next day (12.02.16):
It is nine plastic inner receptacles inside a fiberboard box.

Contact me with any questions you may have about the transportation of hazardous materials by air, highway, vessel, or rail

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Daniels Training Services, Inc.

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I had a reply ready by December 5th:

I have an answer for you, thank you for your patience.  Please see below.

  • For all packed in one there is no requirement to describe the inner packagings.
  • All that is required is to show the net quantity of each of the different dangerous goods in the packaging followed by the statement “all packed in one (type of packaging)” and then the Q value.
  • Some examples of this are shown in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations:  Figure 8.1.G and Figure 8.1.H.
    Page of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

    Figure 8.1.G and Figure 8.1.H.

This matches the overall intent of the DGR when describing dangerous goods on the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods:  To describe the packages one will see when viewing the consignment, i.e. the outer packagings, and not the inner packagings or receptacles.

I hope this helps.  Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions.

That did it!

Thank you!

The transportation of dangerous goods (aka: HazMat) requires initial training before performing a regulated function and new training within 24 months (i.e. biennial).  Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you require this training or if you just have a question.  I’m here to help.