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Required Information on the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods

Required Information on the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods

Section 8 of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations require the shipper of a dangerous good to provide the information specified by the regulations for each and every consignment of dangerous goods unless an exception is provided at 8.0.1.2.  This information may be provided in one of two formats:

  • By EDP (electronic data processing) or EDI (electronic data interchange) techniques, if the operator agrees.

Or…

  • By the use of the “Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods”.

The purpose of this article will be to identify the information that a shipper must provide to the operator when offering a dangerous good for transportation by air.  The same information must appear on the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods or in the form of an EDP or EDI.From 8.1.6 Detailed Instructions for Completing the Declaration Form:

8.1.6.1 – The full name and address of the shipper.  This may differ from the name and address of the shipper that appears on the Air Waybill.

8.1.6.2 – The full name and address of the consignee.   The consignee is defined in Appendix A of the IATA DGR as:  “Any person, organization or government which is entitled to take delivery of a consignment.”  This may not be the physical address of where the dangerous good is delivered.  Also, like the shipper, the name and address of the consignee on the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods Form may differ from that on the Air Waybill.

8.1.6.3 –  The Air Waybill number for the shipment.  Though mandatory, it may be entered or amended by any of the following:

  • The shipper
  • The shipper’s agent
  • The operator
  • The operator’s handling agent

In the case of a consolidated shipment, the number of the House Air Waybill is entered after the Air Waybill number separated by “/”.

8.1.6.4 – Enter the page number and total number of pages.  Enter “Page 1 of 1 pages” if there is no extension list.

8.1.6.5 – Aircraft limitations:  “Passenger and Cargo Aircraft” or “Cargo Aircraft Only” must be indicated.  This may be done in one of two ways depending on the form used:

  • On pre-printed forms the shipper must delete either “Passenger and Cargo Aircraft” or “Cargo Aircraft Only”, as applicable.
  • On a form where the information is entered manually it is acceptable to show only the applicable aircraft type; either “Passenger and Cargo Aircraft” or “Cargo Aircraft Only”.

8.1.6.6 – The full name of the airport or city of departure.  This information is optional and may be left blank.  It may be entered or amended by any of the following:

  • The shipper
  • The shipper’s agent
  • The operator
  • The operator’s handling agent

8.1.6.7 – The full name of the airport or city of departure.  This information is optional and may be left blank.  It may be entered or amended by any of the following:

  • The shipper
  • The shipper’s agent
  • The operator
  • The operator’s handling agent

8.1.6.8 – Shipment Type:  “Non-Radioactive” or “Radioactive” must be indicated.  This may be done in one of two ways depending on the form used:

  •  On pre-printed forms the shipper must delete either “Non-Radioactive” or “Radioactive”, as applicable.
  • On a form where the information is entered manually it is acceptable to show only the applicable shipment type; either “Non-Radioactive” or “Radioactive”.

8.1.6.9 – For a Non-Radioactive shipment the following information must be provided as a description of the nature and quantity of the dangerous goods in transportation:

  • First Sequence:  Identification number, proper shipping name, hazard class, subsidiary hazard class – if applicable, and packing group.
  • Second Sequence:  The number and type of packagings and the quantity (gross or – more likely – net).
  • Third Sequence:  The three digit packing instructions number for the dangerous good from section 5 of the IATA DGR.  It must be prefixed with “Y” if shipped as a Limited Quantity or followed by “IB” if a lithium battery prepared in accordance with Section IB of Packing Instruction 965 or 968.
  • Fourth Sequence:  The Special Provision number from column M of the Dangerous Goods list (subsection 4.2) if it is one of the following:  A1, A2, A4, A5, A81, A88, A99, A130, A190, A191.  A shipper may include other Special Provision numbers applicable to the shipment.  8.1.6.9.4 goes on to list specific circumstances where a consignment is subject to governmental approval or authorizations that require documentation on the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods.

8.1.6.11 – The shipper may enter any special handling information relevant to the consignment.  Be sure to research both the State Variations (seven) and Operator Variations (sixty-three) applicable to this regulation to see if any apply to your consignment.  An entry is required for any of the following:

  • Organic Peroxides and Self-Reactive Substances
  • Chemical Oxygen Generators
  • Infectious Substances and Controlled Substances
  • Fireworks
  • Viscous Flammable Liquids
  • Lithium Batteries packaged per Section IB of Packing Instructions 965 or 968.

8.1.6.12 – The required certification statement and the additional statement required for shipments by air.

8.1.6.13 – The name and title of the person signing the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods.

8.1.6.14 – The place and date the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods form was signed.  The preferred format for the date is:  YYYY-MM-DD.  Other formats (examples below) are acceptable as long as they cannot be misunderstood:

  • DD/MM/YYYY
  • DD.MM.YYYY
  • DD/MMM/YYYY
  • January 20, 2015

8.1.6.15 – The Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods form must be signed and dated by the shipper or a designated representative.

Is there more?  Of course there is.  This is just a summary of the general requirements for completing the Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods as required by IATA for a consignment of dangerous goods shipped by air (domestic or international).

Please contact me if you have more questions.  Or better yet, contact me to schedule Onsite Training and I’ll answer all of the questions you and your employees have about the transportation of dangerous goods by air, vessel, highway, or rail – both international and domestic.