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Ethanol Fast Facts

Ethanol Fast Facts

Economic Impact:
  • In 2014, the ethanol industry created and supported nearly 400,000 jobs.  Moving to E15 would create an additional 136,000 jobs.
  • A recent Louisiana State University study found ethanol reduces gas prices 78 cents a gallon. A consumer savings of more than 100 billion dollars annually.
  • In 2014, the ethanol industry contributed nearly 53 billion dollars to the nation’s GDP and added nearly 27 billion dollars to household income.
  • By creating a steady market for corn and other grains, ethanol helps to reduce federal farm program costs.
Environmental impact:
  • In 2014, the production and domestic use of more than 13 billion gallons of ethanol in the U.S. reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 38 million metric tons, the equivalent of removing roughly 8 million automobiles from the road.
  • Grain ethanol decreases greenhouse gas emissions by up to 57 percent compared to gasoline.
  • Cellulosic  ethanol is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 100 percent or more. Furthermore, the U.S. is home to more than 1 billion tons of available biomass that can be converted to 80-100 billion gallons of ethanol. This is a 50-state solution.
  • New technologies are improving efficiencies and allowing ethanol biorefineries to make better use of natural resources like water.
  • A recent USDA report shows ethanol is more energy efficient to produce than conventional gasoline. Every Btu put into creating ethanol yields a 2.3  Btu return.
Energy Security:
  • Every gallon of clean-burning ethanol that we produce in this country decreases the demand for foreign oil and keeps our money here at home where it can create American jobs.
  • The production of more than 14.3 billion gallons of ethanol in 2014 displaced the need for 515 million barrels of oil.
  • When the RFS when enacted in 2005, America imported 60 percent of its fuel. Today, we import 27 percent.  Switching to domestic energy sources has helped reduce our dependence on foreign oil, strengthening our national security and our economy.
  • We spend more than 300 billion dollars a year – nearly 1000 dollars for every man, woman and child in this country – on foreign oil.
Food and Fuel:
  • A 2003 World Bank study outlines how crude oil prices are responsible for at least 50 percent of the increase in food prices in 2004.
  • The real costs of putting food on the shelf are transportation, processing and packaging – all costs driven by oil.
  • The U.S. ethanol industry uses less than 3 percent of the global grain supply on a net basis.
  • Nearly one-third of every bushel of corn used in ethanol production is returned to the food chain in the form of distiller’s grains, a competitively-priced, nutritious animal feed.
  •  Since only the starch is used and distiller’s grains displace both corn and soybean meal, in reality only 17.5 percent of the net corn acres are used for renewable fuels.

Information provided by: Growth Energy America’s Ethanol Supporters

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