Daniels Training Services

International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Quick Take: Determination of Packing Group for a Class 8 Corrosive

Quick Take: Determination of Packing Group for a Class 8 Corrosive

Whether shipping a hazardous material or dangerous good by highway, air, rail or vessel; whether transported internationally or within the U.S.; the shipper of a hazardous material is responsible for its classification.  This includes – among other things – determining…

Classification of Lithium Batteries for Transportation in Commerce

Classification of Lithium Batteries for Transportation in Commerce

Persons involved in the transportation in commerce of lithium batteries are subject to the regulations of at least one – or perhaps all – of the following regulatory agencies: The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) within the U.S. Department…

Q&A: Using the Marine Pollutant Marking by Land and Water

Here’s a question someone posted to Hazmat101, a Yahoogroup on December 1, 2015: To  compare notes. Are marine pollutant placards required on a truck that contains non-bulk packages on its way to the port per 49 CFR? What if the…

Q&A: Segregation of Limited Quantities

A question from a customer of my ONSITE TRAINING on October 15th, 2015: Hey Daniel, I just had a quick question regarding limited quantities.  If I have 2 different hazmat items that normally could not be shipped together per the…

Significant Changes to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code for 2016

Significant Changes to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code for 2016

December 31, 2015 is the end of the transition year for the 2012 Edition (36-12 Amendment) of the IMDG Code of the International Maritime Organization.  The code is updated every two years but is optional for its first and last…

The IMDG Code Amendment Cycle

If you ship HazMat/Dangerous Goods by vessel in international waters, then you must comply with the regulations of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and its International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code).  But to comply you must make certain that…

General Requirements for the Shipping Paper When Transporting Dangerous Goods by Vessel

Chapter 5.4 of the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (2012 Edition) indicates the requirements of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) for the description of a dangerous good on a shipping paper (referred to in the IMDG Code as a dangerous goods…

Changes to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code – 2014 Edition

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) publishes a new edition of its International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) every two years, with the current edition (2012, incorporating amendment 36-12) published in the Fall of 2012.  Each new edition of the…

An Overview of New Regulations in the 56th Edition (2015) of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

The transportation of hazardous materials (aka: Dangerous Goods) by air will likely have to comply with the Dangerous Goods Regulations of the International Air Transport Association.  I say “likely” because compliance with the DGR of IATA is a requirement of…

Significant Changes and Amendments to the 55th Edition (2014) of the IATA DGR

The Dangerous Goods Regulations of the International Air Transportation Association (IATA) are the standards used by most of the airline industry throughout the world.  If you intend to ship hazardous materials (aka: Dangerous Goods), either domestically (within the US) or…